Overcoming the obstacles to basic healthcare access

This post was written by Chris McKeon, Writer and Production Assistant at Arete Stories.

When The Road Less Travelled project began, the newly-built Morupusi dispensary sat alone on an empty hill. Its metal roof shone but the dust that covers the region had already begun to settle on its walls. Mounds of rubble surrounded it, instead of the people who normally wait outside health centres. Inside, there was nobody. Its walls and rooms were bare. There were neither drugs, nor places to store them nor people to administer them. The dispensary looked abandoned, but it wasn’t – it had never been occupied.

It was built with funds from the local Constituency Development Fund to serve the 4000 Maasai pastoralists who live in the Morupusi Group Ranch, in northern Laikipia, Kenya. They were walking 10 kilometres to the nearest hospital at Doldol, where they would wait for hours to be seen; a return journey that would take up to a day.

Before the clinic opened, women from Morupusi would have to walk to Doldol carrying their children on their backs if they needed medicine.  Image: Matthew Willman / Anglican Overseas Aid

Before the clinic opened, women from Morupusi would have to walk to Doldol carrying their children on their backs if they needed medicine.
Image: Matthew Willman / Anglican Overseas Aid

“We wanted a dispensary here because of the distance,” explains Elizabeth Kaparo, a local Community Health Worker and Treasurer of the dispensary committee. “Women have to walk to Doldol carrying their children on their backs if they want medicine. So we applied to the Constituency Development Fund (CDF) for money.”

Attaining funding to build the clinic was only the first step on a long road to improving access to health services for the Morupusi community. Once it was built, because the Ministry of Health had not been notified about the clinic, there was no budget allocated for staff, and no medical supplies. The building stood empty, and the Maasai continued their long walk to Doldol.

When the Community Development Committee reached out to Anglican Overseas Aid and The Road Less Travelled for help, project staff saw immediate potential in the clinic to become a central hub for community health and education. They formed a three-way partnership with the community and the Ministry of Health.

Continue reading