Keeping track of The Road Less Travelled

We are pleased to announce the publication of The Road Less Travelled Annual Report for 2013-14.

Cover of Annual Report

The report provides detailed feedback about the impact of the project in Ethiopia and Kenya, as well as narrative stories of transformation and life-change. Of paramount importance is the engagement with, and benefit for, the most marginalised people within the project communities, especially women.

This is done through a strengths-based approach to community development, in which communities are at the centre of their own development vision and recognise and draw on their existing assets to achieve their development aims.

“People want to live a good life, so they see the value of our work in the community.
The level of knowledge in the community is slowly increasing.
People are beginning to change.”

Cecilia, a Community Health Worker in Longewan, Samburu County, Kenya

Significant progress has been made, with:

  • 2584 additional people having access to sustainable, safe water.
  • 3283 additional people having access to appropriate sanitation.
  • 506 additional people accessing a modern family planning method.
  • 1278 additional children receiving vaccines within the first 12 months of life.
  • 379 child deliveries occurred with a skilled birth attendant present.
  • 317,150 people received vital health education messages around measles, malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia and nutrition.

“Mille hospital has changed the lives of mothers. There is less threat of abnormal presentations and good food is supplied to expectant mothers.”
(Response from a men’s Focus Group Discussion)

You can read the report here: The Road Less Travelled Annual Report 2013-14

The Road Less Travelled: Update

As you are likely aware, this blog has been somewhat dormant over the past few months as we have transitioned its management from Australian Volunteers International (AVI) to the lead project partner, Anglican Overseas Aid.

Changes in Federal Government funding meant that AVI could no longer undertake the communications component of the project. We offer our deep gratitude to AVI, and particularly to Hannah Ford, for the amazing work they have done to run this blog. We highly recommend reading Hannah’s powerful final blog post ‘If these hands could talk’.

We regret that the transition has taken longer than expected, but we are looking forward to sharing a range of new stories over the coming weeks and months.

Of particular note, we recently completed our Annual Report for 2013-14, which outlines the progress made through the project. We will make it available here soon.

Over the coming weeks and months we will be sharing:

  • interviews with voluntary and professional health workers in Kenya
  • an article about cultural shifts among the pastoralists of Ethiopia and Kenya
  • video news stories about our work from National TV in Kenya
  • an article about small steps creating big changes through women’s empowerment
We hope you will continue the journey with us along The Road Less Travelled.

Australia-Africa partnership delivers life-saving results

Anglican Overseas Aid is honored to work in partnership with the Australian Government and nine other Australian non-government organisations to deliver a program in Africa that is saving lives and helping communities take control of their futures.

The latest annual report has been released for the Australia Africa Community Engagement Scheme (AACES), now in its second year. Through this scheme, Anglican Overseas Aid delivers The Road Less Travelled project with partners the Afar Pastoralist Development Association in Ethiopia, the Mothers’ Union of the Anglican Church of Kenya, the Nossal Institute for Global Health and Australian Volunteers International.

The AACES Annual Report 2012-2013 is now available on the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) website. It highlights the impressive achievements of the 10 Australian NGOs and their African partners in the program’s second year.

To read the summary or download the report, visit: http://aid.dfat.gov.au/Publications/Pages/aaces-annual-report.aspx

Or read the news feature on the DFAT website here.

AACES Annual Report 2012-2013

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Identifying a model for improved maternal and newborn care in pastoralist communities

This post was written by Natalie Stephens and Dr Michelle Kermode of the Nossal Institute for Global Health – Anglican Overseas Aid’s partner in The Road Less Travelled project.

A woman in Kenya is hundreds of times more likely to die during pregnancy and childbirth than a woman in Australia. The level of risk for women and their babies during pregnancy and childbirth is the largest health gap between rich and poor countries.

Fifteen percent of all pregnancies and births have life-threatening complications and, while most cannot be predicted, the majority of complications can be managed safely by skilled birth attendants such as doctors and nurses.

Pastoralist mothers wait for check-ups outside a health clinic in Samburu County, Kenya. Image: Matthew Willman / Anglican Overseas Aid

Pastoralist mothers wait for check-ups outside a health clinic in Samburu County, Kenya.
Image: Matthew Willman / Anglican Overseas Aid

There is strong evidence to show that access to skilled care during pregnancy, birth and the first month after delivery, is key to saving the lives of mothers and their babies. Yet, in 2013 more than half of all women giving birth in developing countries do so alone or attended by people such as traditional birth attendants or family carers, inadequately trained or resourced to respond in the event of birth complications. As a result, maternal mortality rates are unacceptably high and women are dying unnecessarily as a result of preventable causes.

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Reflections on the progress of a partnership

Last month saw the release of the inaugural Annual Report for AusAID’s Australia Africa Community Engagement Scheme (AACES). The Road Less Travelled is being delivered by Anglican Overseas Aid (AOA) as part of this program.

The report is available on AusAID’s website and it highlights the progress made by all the partners in the first year of the program. Our Africa Program Advisor, Phillip Walker, is Chair of the AACES Program Steering Committee. He explains the partnership on the Engage blog, saying:

“AACES is unlike typical grant/donor relationships; it is a partnership agreement between AusAID, 10 Australian NGOs and their African partners. All parties value and support one another to get the best development outcomes in the African countries where we work.

“[It] recognises Australian NGOs’ positive record of working in Africa for some fifty years. Australian NGOs provide unique skills, have a strong base within the communities they work with and are there for the long haul.”

Naatena Lenayora, a mother from the pastoralist community of Samburu, Kenya, where The Road Less Travelled is supporting community-led initiatives to improve the health of women and children. Image: Jay Maheswaran

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