The changing role of Maasai men in maternal health

James Senjura works closely with the Maasai pastoralist community of Laikipia, Kenya, to improve maternal and child health. He is a Project Officer for Mothers’ Union, Anglican Overseas Aid’s partner in The Road Less Travelled project, and also a father and positive role model for other men in his community. The project works with the community to identify key development challenges, and helps to develop locally-appropriate solutions to deliver basic health care and education where access to formal services is limited. James answers some questions about traditions and gender norms relating to maternal and child health within his culture.

In the Maasai community of Laikipia, how would you describe the traditional role of men in maternal and child health?

Traditionally, men’s role in maternal and child care has been passive. Maternal and child health care was in the hands of traditional birth attendants and old women.

Mostly men provide financial support and organise for transportation, and sometimes in consultation with the traditional birth attendant they decide for further action in case of complications or disease occurring. The father would advise on the estimated date of delivery, so that the woman would be prepared.

Image: Matthew Willman / Anglican Overseas Aid

Traditionally, the role of Maasai men in maternal health and child care has been a passive one. Image: Matthew Willman / Anglican Overseas Aid

It was also the role of man to source food (slaughter animals, draw blood) for the mother during and after pregnancy. When a woman was in the last trimester, the man would ready some rams for slaughter after delivery.

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